"Critical to changing consumer behaviours is the availability of a range of healthier choices and dietary options. We will continue our individual efforts to reformulate products and bring to the market new products which support the goals of improving diets and reducing obesity such as lower salt (consistent with food safety requirements), free sugars, saturated fats, and trans-fatty acids in all countries in which we operate around the world. We will also continue our efforts with respect to portion control."

— IFBA letter to WHO Director-General Dr. Margaret Chan 13 May, 2008

 

Since 2004, we have played an important role in addressing public health nutrition problems related to both overnutrition and undernutrition. We have reformulated and developed tens of thousands of products with less fat, sugar, calories or salt; virtually eliminated industrially produced trans fats from our product portfolios; increased ingredients considered beneficial for good health, such as fibre, whole grains, fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy; and fortified commonly consumed foods with calcium, vitamins and minerals to address micronutrient deficiencies. We are reducing calories by offering smaller portion sizes and providing portion guidance.

 

Reducing sodium is complex and challenging, both technically and in terms of consumer acceptance.  For many years, IFBA members have been using their R&D talents and consumer insights to reformulate their products to provide a broad range of foods containing no- or low-sodium or no salt and to raise awareness and create a demand for lower-sodium products.

IFBA members have achieved large reductions in salt over time by implementing slow and gradual reductions

to help consumers adjust their taste preference and prevent them from adding salt back in at the table. Salt reductions have been achieved through recipe reformulations, the introduction of salt replacers, such as lower-sodium sea salt and salt enhancements such as aromas, herbs and spices.

We will continue reducing sodium in our products, wherever possible, with due regard to the WHO’s recommendation for daily salt intake.

The following chart illustrates IFBA members’ commitments and achievements to reduce sodium n their product portfolios.

 

 

Sodium Reduction

FerreroCommitment:  No products shall contain a sodium content level in excess of 150mg/100g.
Achievements:  End fiscal 2015 - The sodium level in 89% of products is below 150mg/100g.

IFBA Member Commitment and Achievements
Danone Commitment:  To maintain continuous nutritional improvement of its products. The Danone Nutritional Targets 2020 are based on product type, its place in dietary recommendations, its intended role in the diet and intended consumer.

Achievements:  End 2016 – 85% of sales volumes of the product portfolio is in line with the salt target in the Danone Nutritional Targets 2020.

General Mills Commitment:   To improve the health and nutrition of products with the implementation of the General Mills U.S. Health Metric, introduced in 2005 and including a sodium reduction target of 5% or more.

Achievements:  Since 2005 – Sodium reduced by 5-25% in more than 420 products and a number of lower-sodium products introduced.

Grupo Bimbo Commitment:  By 2020 – products that represent 80% of sales (per region) must comply with the following levels:  breads and buns ≤ 500mg/100 g; tortillas ≤ 670mg/100 g; and snacks ≤ 700mg/100 g.

Achievements:  End 2015 – 28% average reduction in sodium among leading sliced bread brands in Mexico and the USA.

Kellogg Commitment:  By 2020 – (i) Reduce sodium in cereals on average by more than 30%; ensure that 85% of cereals have 150mg or less of sodium per 30g serving; and (ii) at least 85% of convenient nutrition snacks will have 150 or fewer mg of sodium per serving..

Achievements:  In 2016 – Exceeded 2020 target of 85% reduction of 150mg or less of sodium per 30g serving, achieving 88% reduction; completed 2020 target to have 75% of cracker portfolio with 230mg or less of sodium per serving.

In 2015 – Achieved the 30% reduction of sodium in cereals on average by more than 30% with a total reduction of 44% since 2007.

Mars Commitment:  By 2021 - Reduce sodium in the global portfolio by 20% (beyond the 2007-2012 reduction).

Achievements:  Reduced sodium by 25% between 2007 and 2012.

McDonald's Commitment:  By 2020 – Reduce salt/sodium across the menu in the top nine markets.

Achievements:  End 2014 – Sodium reduced:  (i) in commonly used ingredients, e.g. burger buns, American cheese, ketchup helping to reduce sodium in the cheeseburger by an average of 10% and in Big Mac by an average of 9% in key markets; and (ii) in medium-sized French fries by approx. 58% since 2010 in France and Germany and by approx. 30% in the USA.

Mondelēz International Commitment:  By 2020 – Reduce sodium by 10% across global portfolio (from a 2012 baseline).

Achievements:  End 2016 – Sodium reduced by 5% across global portfolio.

Nestlé Commitment:  By 2020 – Reduce sodium by 20%.

Achievements:  End 2016 – Reduced sodium content by 10.5% in foods and beverages, exceeding the 2016 reduction objective.
.

PepsiCo Commitment:  By 2025 - At least 3/4 of the global foods portfolio volume will not exceed 1.3mg of sodium per calorie.

Achievements:  In 2015 – Reduced average sodium per serving in key global food brands in key countries by 12% (against a 2006 baseline) and against a 2020 target of 25% reduction.

Unilever Commitment:  By 2020 – 75% of the Foods portfolio will meet salt levels to enable intakes of 5g per day.

Achievements:  End 2016 – 61% of the Foods portfolio was compliant with the 5g target.

Over the years IFBA members have been working to remove trans fats from their products and have committed to phase-out industrially produced trans fats from their products globally by the end of 2018.

Reducing saturated fats in processed foods – especially in baked goods and confectionary products – while maintaining shelf life and an appealing appearance, texture and taste is challenging. There is no one-size fits all solution and each option needs to be applied differently to each food product.  Notwithstanding these challenges, saturated fats have been reduced and levels of essential fats and “good” or “healthy” fats have been increased. IFBA members continue to look for ways to reduce or remove fat, wherever possible.

The following chart illustrates IFBA members’ commitments and achievements to reduce saturated fat in their product portfolios.

IFBA Member Commitment and Achievements
Ferrero Commitment:  The company does not use hydrogenated fats bearing trans fats; nor does it artificially add micronutrients to its products.

Achievements:  In 2013, the company confirmed the universal adoption of manufacturing processes which avoid the use of hydrogenated fats.

Danone Commitment:  To maintain continuous nutritional improvement of its products. The Danone Nutritional Targets 2020 are based on product type, its place in dietary recommendations, its intended role in the diet and intended consumer.

Achievements:  At end 2016 – 97% of sales volumes of the product portfolio is in line with the saturated fat target in the Danone Nutritional Targets 2020.

General Mills Commitment:    A sugar reduction target of 5% or more and strategy to limit calories.

Achievements:  To improve the health and nutrition of products with the implementation of the General Mills U.S. Health Metric, introduced in 2005 and including a saturated fat reduction target of 5% or more.

Achievements: . In FY2016 - Trans fats reduced to 0g labelled per serving in 275 products and 50 new products introduced with 0g labelled trans fat per serving since 2005.

Grupo Bimbo Commitment: By 2020 - To have 30% of the product portfolio considered healthy. The strategy of reducing negative-impact nutrients, such as sugars, saturated fats and sodium was completed in 2015 and in 2016, the company adopted a new strategy, establishing the maximum limits of fat, sugars and sodium content for each category with a view to improving the profile of all its products.

Achievements:  End 2015 – 27% average reduction in saturated fats in leading snack brands in Mexico; removal of trans fat in 99% of global product portfolio.

Kellogg Commitment:  No more than 2g saturated fat/0g trans fat per serving for products marketed to children.

Achievements:  More than 95% of foods in the USA are labelled 0g trans fat per serving.

Mars Commitment:  By 2021:  95% of products should meet Mars Food Nutrition Criteria for sodium, added sugar and fat.

Achievements:  End 2016 – 65% of the global portfolio (by sales volume) met the Mars Food Nutrition Criteria for calories, sodium, added sugars, fat and saturated fat content.  Products have been reformulated removing trans fats; a small number of products contain trace amounts, primarily from animal-derived ingredients.  

McDonald's Commitment: By 2020 – Reduce saturated fats across the menu in the nine top markets.

Achievements:  End 2014 – Achieved average reduction of saturated fat of 14.7% in Europe and more than 30% in Singapore.

Mondelēz International Commitment:  By 2020 - Reduce saturated fat by 10%.

Achievements:  End 2016 – Saturated fat reduced by 6% across global portfolio.

Nestlé Commitment: By 2020 – Complete the 10% commitment taken in 2014 to reduce saturated fats by 10% in all relevant products that do not meet Nestlé Nutritional Foundation criteria with respect to saturated fats.

Achievements:  End 2016 – Saturated fat content reduced by 6.5%.  More than 99.8% of the fats and oils used in foods and beverages from 1 January 2017 will not contain trans fats originating from PHOs.

PepsiCo Commitment: By 2025 – At least 3/4 of the global foods portfolio volume will not exceed 1.1g of saturated fat per 100 calories.

Achievements:  End 2015 – Reduced average saturated fat per serving by 3% against a 2006 baseline and 15% target by 2020.  Five of ten countries met the 15% target in 2015.

Unilever Commitment:  By 2017 - 90% of complete global portfolio of soft vegetable oil spreads will contain no more than 33% fat as saturated fat and at least 67% as good unsaturated fat (or 38% in tropical areas without chilled distribution).

Achievements:  End 2016 – 79% of the global portfolio met the goal.

Reducing Sugar and Calories

IFBA members are working to help consumers improve their dietary quality and manage their caloric and sugar intake, by formulating products with less or no sugar using low- and no-calorie sweeteners and other ingredients as alternatives to sugars and reducing calories by offering smaller portion sizes and providing portion guidance.

The following chart illustrates IFBA members’ commitments and achievements to reduce sugar and provide portion control options.

IFBA Member Commitment and Achievements
The Coca-Cola Company Commitment:  Support the WHO’s guideline that people limit their daily calorie intake from added sugar to no more than 10% of their total calorie intake by providing smaller, more convenient package sizes, introducing new reduced and no-sugar drinks and reducing sugar in existing drinks around the world.  In 2017 – Reduce sugar in 500 drinks (adding to the current 1,100 drinks with reduced or no-sugar).

Achievements:  In 2016 – Sugar reduced in more than 200 drinks globally, while introducing more than 500 new products, nearly 400 of which were teas, juices, coffees, waters and other drinks. Today, more than 1,100 of the drinks are reduced or no-sugar.

Ferrero Commitment:  Reduce sugar in new products with regard to the overall energy level and product’s integration into a varied and complete diet.

Achievements:  In FY 2014/2015 – (i) Approx. 80% of products provide less than 130Kcal/per portion and the average calorie intake is lower than 100Kcal; and (ii) more than 70% of products are offered in portions weighing less than 25g and more than 80% in portions smaller than 45g.

Danone Commitment:  Reduce sugar in new products with regard to the overall energy level and product’s integration into a varied and complete diet.

Achievements:  End 2016 – 70% of sales volume of the product portfolio is in line with the sugar target in the Danone Nutritional Targets 2020.

General Mills Commitment:   To improve the health and nutrition of products with the implementation of the General Mills U.S. Health Metric, introduced in 2005 and including a sugar reduction target of 5% or more and strategy to limit calories.

Achievements:  FY05-FY16 – (i) Reduced sugar by 5-30% in more than 260 products and introduced lower-sugar products; (ii) 2/3 of North American retail products are 150 calories or less per serving; 1,300+ U.S. retail products have 150 calories or less per serving; and 600+ U.S. retail product have 100 calories or less per serving.

Grupo Bimbo Commitment:  By 2020 – (i) products that represent 80% of sales (per region) must comply with the following levels: breads and buns: white bread ≤ 5g/100g and specialty breads ≤ 7/100g; and sweet baked goods ≤ 35g/100g; and (ii) increase sales in snacks or mini version products to help manage caloric intake by 40%.

Achievement:  Developed products with reduced portions, or “minis” with less energy content (with no more than 100Kcal in most cases).

Kellogg Commitment:  By 2020 - Reduce sugar so that 90% of ready-to-eat cereals have 10g or less of sugar per 30g serving.

Achievements:  End 2016 – Goal achieved.

Mars Commitment:  Support the WHO’s guideline that people limit their daily calorie intake from added sugar to no more than 10% of their total calorie intake.  By 2018 – reduce added sugar in some sauces and light meals.

Achievements:  End 2016 – 99% of all chocolate and confectionary products have less than 250Kcal per portion.

McDonald's Commitment:  By 2020 – Reduce sugar or calories across the menu in the nine top markets.

Achievements:  July 2014-May 2015 - Since sodas were removed from Happy Meals in the U.S. menu, milk and juice selections rose 9%.

Mondelēz International Commitment:  By 2020 – Expand portion control options (200 calories or less) by 25%.  Adopt a multipronged approach to sugar reduction – create new products with less sugar; reduce sugar amount in current products; launch and support lower sugar sub-lines, increase portion control options; and reinforce portion messaging on pack.

Achievements:  End 2016 – (i) Goal achieved – portion control options grew by 39% in the portfolio; and (ii) 15% of the portfolio is sugar-free or sugar-reduced.

Nestlé Commitment:  By 2020 – Reduce added sugars by 5%

Achievements:  End of 2016 – Reduced added sugar content by 8%.
.

PepsiCo Commitment: By 2025 – At least 2/3 of the global beverage portfolio volume will have 100 calories or fewer from added sugar per 12-oz. serving.

Achievements:  In 2015 – Average amount of added sugars per serving in total beverage portfolios reduced against the 2006 baseline and 2020 target of 25% for 8 out of 10 key countries tracked.  The average amount of added sugars per serving in the total beverage portfolio increased by 4% compared with a 2006 baseline.
.

Unilever Achievements:By 2015 – 80% of packaged pice cream products will not exceed 250Kcal per portion

Commitment:  By 2020 - Remove an additional 25% sugar in ready-to-drink teas.By 2015 – 80% of packaged ice cream products will not exceed 250Kcal per portion.

Product formulation and innovation is not just about removing nutrients of public health concern – it is also about adding ingredients considered beneficial for good health – whole grains, fibre, fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy.
IFBA members are also committed to improving the nutrition of populations at risk of not getting enough vitamins and minerals, particularly in developing and emerging countries. Micronutrient deficiencies in iron, iodine, vitamins A and D and zinc are the most widespread form of undernutrition. Members work in partnership with scientists, local governments and health care professionals to identify the different nutritional “gaps” in diets and to develop micronutrient-fortified foods and beverages at an affordable price.
The following chart illustrates IFBA members’ commitments and achievements to combat undernutrition and to add beneficial ingredients to their products.

IFBA Member Commitment and Achievements
The Coca-Cola Company Commitment: Producing drinks that are better and more nutritious by adding vitamins, minerals and protein, as well as more natural and organic ingredients when possible.

Achievements:  In Japan, Coke Plus contains 5g dietary fibre and 0 calories per bottle.

Ferrero Commitment:  To continue to develop products containing fibre and micronutrients, like vitamins and minerals naturally present in the raw ingredients used in its products (e.g. hazelnuts), without artificial supplements.

Achievements: FY2013-2014 – the amount of low-fat dairy ingredients used in products has increased 12%.

Danone Commitment:  By 2020 - Further reinforce our expertise on the understanding of local nutrition practices and public health contexts with 100% of major markets covered.

Achievements:  End 2016 – 50% of volumes sold are fortified products.

General Mills Commitment: To improve the health and nutrition of products with the implementation of the General Mills U.S. Health Metric, introduced in 2005 and including increasing beneficial ingredients by 10% or more and formulating products to include at least a half serving of whole grain, fruit, vegetables, or low- or non-fat dairy.

Achievements:  End fiscal 2016 -  Since 2005: (i) introduced more than 250 products that provide at least 8g of whole grain per serving and reformulated more than 50 products to increase whole grain by at least 10%.; (ii) introduced more than 250 products that provide a significant source of dietary fibre per serving and increased dietary fibre in another 25 products by at least 10%; and (iii) introduced more than 430 products that are sources of key vitamins and minerals, such as yogurt and cereal.

Grupo Bimbo Commitment: By 2020 - 25% of the global product portfolio must be a “good source” of fibre (according to local regulations) or have more than 8g of whole grains per serving.

Achievements:  Developed popular, affordable and widely consumed products, such as white bread, to carry important nutrients such as iron, zinc and vitamin A for vulnerable populations.

Kellogg Commitment:  By 2020 – (i) Include one or more positive nutrients or ingredients in every snack food in the convenient nutrition category; and (ii) add more beneficial nutrients, including protein and Omega-3 fatty acids to cereals; increase the variety of grains and plant-based ingredients to provide protein, fibre and whole grains; and (iii) ensure that 100% of cereals have at least one nutrient that consumers do not get enough of, such as vitamin D, fibre or iron.

Achievements:  Committed to helping consumers increase fibre in their diets, in the USA, ready-to-eat cereals offer a good source of fibre (3g) and 8g of whole grains.

Mars Commitment: By 2021 – Ensure 50% of rice products will include at least one serving of whole grains or legumes.

Achievements:  End 2016 – 38% of rice targets achieved the 2021 target; and 100% of tomato-based cooking sauces deliver at least one serving of fruits or vegetables per serving.

McDonald's Commitment: By 2020 – serve 100% more fruit, vegetables, low-fat dairy or whole grains in the nine top markets.

Achievements:  July 2014-May 2015 - USA – (i) Sold 21 million additional low-fat and fat-free milk jugs and 100% apple juice boxes; and (ii) introduced new Happy Meal options which resulted in 161 million tubes of Go-GURT® Low Fat Strawberry Yogurts and 38 million Cuties Clementines in Happy Meals and a la carte.

Mondelēz International Commitment: By 2020:  Increase whole grains by 25%.

Achievements:  End 2015 – Goal achieved

Nestlé Commitment: By 2020 – Address undernutrition through micronutrient fortification: (i) add at least 750 million portions of vegetables, 300 million portions of fibre-rich grains, pulses, nuts and seeds; (ii) in addition to whole grain already being the number one ingredient in ready-to-eat breakfast cereals for children and teenagers, all cereals will be a source of fibre, with as much fibre as possible coming from whole grain; and (iii) reach millions of children and families with fortified foods and beverages; (iv) initiate collective actions to reduce micronutrient deficiencies in 10 countries; and (v) continue to develop the supply chain for biofortified crops and expand the fortified portfolio.

Achievements:  End 2016 – (i) Provided 207 billion micronutrient-fortified servings of foods and beverages worldwide (an increase from 192 billion in 2015); and (ii) 93% of ready-to-eat cereals for children and teenagers achieved the objective for whole grains i.e. ensuring that there are more whole grains than any other ingredient in the cereal.

PepsiCo Commitment: By 2025 – Provide at least 3 billion servings of nutritious foods and beverages to underserved communities and consumers.

Achievements:  In 2015 – (i) introduced new whole grain products around the world; and (ii) expanded established fruit and vegetable brands.
.

Unilever Commitment:  (i) To offer products with important micronutrients to help combat undernutrition and promote good nutrition through partnerships with local governments, civil society and UN agencies; and (ii) continue work to increase the nutrition of children’s ice creams through vitamin and mineral fortification or by increasing the dairy or fruit content.

Achievements:  In 2016 – Approx. 15% of food and beverage sales (by volume), more than 1/3 of which are sold in developing and emerging countries, contributed to the recommended daily intake of five key nutrients – iodine, vitamin A, vitamin D, zinc and iron.